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5 Filipino Kakanin Desserts To Try

Travel around the Philippines and taste these Filipino delicacies, which are perfect for your sweet tooth.

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Eating plays a big role in Filipino culture. Every meal is a feast, and a good feast always ends with dessert. One of the most common types of Filipino dessert is kakanin, which are basically rice- or rice flour-based desserts. If you're craving for something sweet, check out these popular delicacies.


Puto
Puto is one of the most common kakanin dishes. Made from slightly sweetened steamed rice flour, it is generally hard and porous in texture. Over the years, puto has evolved into a dessert with various flavors and colors. You can now eat ube, pandan, and even cheese puto. If you are truly a fan of this dessert, visit Bulacan on December 8 to celebrate Pistang Puto Day.

Need a place to stay after your food trip? For Bulacan hotels, browse here on TravelBook.ph.


Kutsinta
If there is puto, then there must be kutsinta. These complementary kakanin are almost always sold together because they are both made of the same ingredients. The preparation just slightly differs, creating two different textures and tastes. Unlike puto, which is usually eaten as is, kutsinta is usually served with lots of coconut husk bits, which complement its very sticky texture.

Need a place to stay after your food trip? For Bulacan hotels, browse here on TravelBook.ph.


Sapin-Sapin
This kakanin is made up of glutinous rice flour, coconut milk, and sugar with each layer having a different color and flavor. It’s a very sticky dish that has a very smooth and silky texture, and it almost always melts in your mouth when you eat it. The three layers are made of ube, white sugar, and brown sugar. Nueva Ecija is said to be the home of sapin-sapin, so make sure you taste their variation.

Need a place to stay after your food trip? For Nueva Ecija hotels, browse here on TravelBook.ph.


Pichi-Pichi
Another foodie favorite is pichi-pichi. Instead of rice flour, pichi-pichi uses cassava flour, mixing it with lye to give it a golden tint and chewy texture. Pichi-pichi are often translucent and shaped like small balls, which are then rolled in either cheese of  coconut. One of the best variations of pichi-pichi can be found in Malabon.

Need a place to stay after your food trip? For Metro Manila hotels, browse here on TravelBook.ph.


Biko
Next to suman, biko is probably one of the few kakanin dishes that still resemble rice. It is usually made by boiling glutinous rice in coconut milk, which is then left to cool. It is often served with latik, which are solid coconut curds that come from simmering coconut milk until it turns into oil. You can try some of the best biko in Surigao.

Need a place to stay after your food trip? For Surigao hotels, browse here on TravelBook.ph.


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